Out of the Wilderness Book – PayPal

Out_of_the_Wilderness_covers_nov_11Out of the Wilderness is the first ever history of the Town of Eastchester has arrived!

Copies can be purchased for $50 per copy at the following locations:

 Womrath Bookshop
76 Pondfield Road in Bronxville
(Store hours: Monday-Saturday 9am – 6pm and Sunday 12-5pm)

 Cornell’s True Value Store
310 White Plains Road in Eastchester
(Store hours: Monday-Saturday 8am – 6pm and Sunday 10am-4pm)

 Village and Town Clerk Offices
Eastchester Town Hall, Tuckahoe Village Hall, Bronxville Village Hall
(During regular business hours)

CLICK HERE FOR A PRINTABLE ORDER FORM

A legacy of the 350th Anniversary Celebration of Eastchester, Tuckahoe and Bronxville,  this hardbound, richly illustrated history reveals significant elements in the story of the town and villages as they developed. Against the backdrop of the communities’ shared past and the nation’s progress,  the narrative highlights Eastchester’s remarkable story with newly discovered information and fresh insights.  More than 300 pages of engaging detail are in this once-in-350 years volume! “It is a monumental achievement” with “meticulous research, lively text and beautiful illustrations,” said Katie Hite and Patrick Raftery of the Westchester County Historical Society.

 Out of the Wilderness is “magnificent,” said Pelham historian Blake Bell, who described it as an “entertaining, carefully-crafted, lovingly-detailed, and richly illustrated record” of 350 years of history. The book has something for everyone, Bell noted. “For some, it will be a handsome, lavish and cherished coffee table book to be thumbed through and marveled at for many years. For others, like me, it will be an important tool that furthers the understanding of our shared local history and the contexts within which that history has evolved.”

 Out of the Wilderness details Eastchester’s 1665 civil covenant that governed town life in the 17th century, a 1773 Eastchester election documented by John Peter Zinger, Eastchester’s devastation in the Neutral Ground of the Revolution, the town’s posture during the Civil War, its acceptance and practice of African-American slavery well into the 1800s, the 19th century transformation of farmland to suburbia flanked by two rivers, and the political and social forces that reduced Eastchester (through the loss of Mount Vernon and the northeast Bronx) to less than half its original size. The early 20th century, with its population explosion, changing demographics, expanding public schools, outstanding athletes and the Great Depression, is also featured.